RUSSELL BRAND AND THE DRUG OF CONNECTION

Not The Only One

I have always found Russell Brand to be an interesting sort of fellow. He is in a similar vein to the likes of Frankie Boyle and Charlie Brooker, satirists who think well beyond normal conventions, shining a much needed harsh light on our modern consumerist societies and our stagnant politicians. I have read his books My Booky Wook, Booky Wook 2, and Revolution, all strongly recommended.

Recovery

Brand has a new book out that I am looking forward to reading, Recovery: Freedom From Our Addictions. As part of the promotional tour Brand did for this book, he appeared on the TV show Real Time With Bill Maher. He had the host, the guests, and the audience in fits of laughter as well providing deep insights into his own personal life:

In the interview Brand touches on subjects such as addiction and depression. These topics, along with the topics of loneliness, mental health, and suicide, are all unfortunately spread prominently across the news spectrum right now. With regards to all this, Richard Carlton-Crabtree, director of services with Insight Healthcare, provided the following stark reality of where society is right now:

The reality of it is that one in four adults will experience a mental illness at some point each year in the UK. Something we never hear is that we only expect to help 15 per cent of them…one in four of the UK’s adult population is roughly 13 million people. – Richard Carlton-Crabtree

It does really seem that these issues are everywhere right now…

Tuesday 10th October 2017 was World Mental Health Day.

Princes William and Harry, along with Kate Middleton, have been heavily involved in raising aware around mental health by promoting the Heads Together mental health campaign, the London Marathon’s charity of the year.

Recently the singer Sinead O’Connor posted a video online that offered raw insights into her daily battle to control her inner demons. Filmed in her hotel room in New Jersey, the weeping singer sobbed to the camera: “My entire life is revolving around not dying, and that’s not living.”

Other celebrities have also spoken about these issues, such as singer Selena Gomez, comedian Roseanne Barr, author Ruby Wax, boxer Frank Bruno, footballer Chris Kirkland, and actor David Harewood.

We also have continuous newspaper headlines such as British Teenagers Among Least Satisfied In Western World, Loneliness Is Harming Our Society. Your Kindness Is The Best Cure, and Man Down: Why Do So Many Suffer Depression In Silence? You need not search for too long to find such articles, especially in the age of Trump.

We have also seen the suicides of celebrities such as Robin Williams from a few years ago, to more recently Chris Cornell (lead vocalist for the rock bands Soundgarden and Audioslave) and Chester Bennington (lead vocalist for the rock band Linkin Park). I find it interesting that certain celebrities, including Kurt Cobain from over 20 years ago, were living their dreams, yet it seems the reality of that dream coming true did not fulfill expectations. Speaking about Bennington’s death, the journalist Richard Taylor said:

When you’re mentally ill, “normality” becomes meaningless and the world reflects the distorted and warped version of reality you project through bloodshot eyes…Suicide is the biggest killer of men in Britain between the ages of 20 and 50, but we seem only to talk about it when famous men die. – Richard Taylor

Aside from all this, it is the thoughts of Russell Brand that I find most interesting. Here is someone who has suffered from depression, anxiety, addiction, loneliness, and suicidal tendencies. Here is someone who has tried to find meaning and happiness in copious amounts of drugs, sex, money, and fame. None of these things fulfilled him in ways that made long lasting sense. Instead Brand has decided to focus on connecting with people through real emotions, “the drug of connection” as he describes it, something that seems to have worked for him.

Here are some short videos from Brand exploring in more detail some of the topics touched upon in this blog. Each video is interesting in its own right, but collectively they shed much needed sanitized light on ‘we’ as a society. Not sure if they are therefore enjoyable, but they are certainly enlightening…


Chris Cornell: Suicide Epidemic – Why?

Chester Bennington: What Does The Suicide Epidemic Say About Our Culture?

Sinead O’Connor: Do We Live In A Mentally Ill System?

Addiction Epidemic – Why Is The World In Pain?

Why Are Mental Health Issues Increasing?

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